tutorials

Ruby Pocket – Part II

Ruby Pocket – Part II

Time for another installment of the kangaroo pocket on the Ruby hoodie design. After the front of the sweater is knit up to about the armhole, pause and knit the front of the pocket. All the stitches are nicely being held on waste yarn. It’s time to slip them onto your knitting needle. The stitches slip more easily onto a smaller-sized needle. I increase one stitch on each end of the first row of the pocket. This creates a seam allowance read more

Ruby Pocket

Ruby Pocket

I can’t seem to get away from knitting Rubies! This one is knit with Smooshy by Dream in Color and Cherry Tree Hill’s Supersock Select. For a long time I’ve been wanting to show you a tutorial for the pocket front on the Ruby sweater. I don’t like sewing my knitting together and this method avoids having to sew the pocket at the top and the bottom. Note: you may click on all the photos to see a larger image. Divide Pocket read more

Kangaroo pocket seam

Kangaroo pocket seam

I found these photos languishing in a directory on my computer. Then I remembered that I meant to show you how I sew the kangaroo pocket on to the front of my hoodie. For most seams I really like to use mattress stitch which is also sometimes called invisible seam, running thread seam, ladder stich, vertical grafting and weaving. With mattress stitch the seam is generally sewn one stitch in from the edges thus requiring a one-stitch selvage on each edge. This pocket has an extra stitch on each side specifically for the selvage. read more

Curvy seam allowance, straight seams

Curvy seam allowance, straight seams

Recently a knitter asked me about how to seam the Peacock sweater. Great question, Beryl! Especially since the seams are all wavy as the peacock lace stitch distorts the rows of knitting. Naturally you don’t want a scalloped shoulder seam–the ideal is for it to be straight–and the same goes for the armholes. To avoid unsightly scalloped seams, sew straight across the shoulder seams and sleeve tops and don’t be tempted to follow the bind-off edges. For these seams I really like crocheting them together because I can match the two sides up stitch by read more