increases & decreases

Cabled Decreases

Cabled Decreases

Video Tutorial Cabled decreases are an elegant way to knit double, triple and even quadruple decreases that lay flat. I like using them in my designs that incorporate English tailored shoulders. I often use double decreases on the back shoulder shaping and I find that cabled decreases are a sophisticated alternative for k3tog and sssk. This video, along with several more, was produced to support the techniques mentioned in my book, Tempest: a collection of 11 patterns designed by Holli Yeoh for SweetGeorgia Yarns. Special thanks to Felicia Lo of SweetGeorgia Yarns for producing read more

Raised Increases Video Tutorial

Raised Increases Video Tutorial

Video Tutorial Learn how to do my absolute favourite, go-to increase—the raised increase. I use it in almost everything. It’s the least disruptive to the stitches around it and if only a single raised increase is worked, it’s virtually invisible in a ground of stockinette stitch. This video, along with several more, was produced to support the techniques mentioned in my book, Tempest: a collection of 11 patterns designed by Holli Yeoh for SweetGeorgia Yarns. Special thanks to Felicia Lo of SweetGeorgia Yarns for producing the video. You can view my photo tutorial of read more

SSK & SSP Decreases

SSK & SSP Decreases

Video Tutorial The ssk decrease leans to the left and mirrors the right-leaning k2tog decrease. In some patterns we need to do the decrease on the purl side of the work—ssp. It can seem a little tricky at first so here’s a video to help you through it. ssk—slip, slip, knit Slip the next 2 stitches knitwise one at a time and, without twisting them, return them to the left needle then k2tog through the back of the stitches—1 stitch decreased. ssp—slip, slip, purl Slip the next 2 stitches knitwise one at a time and, without twisting them, return them read more

Centred Double Decrease

Centred Double Decrease

Video Tutorial I like using a centred double decrease when I want I nice vertical line. It’s a decrease that uses three stitches to create one stitch, thus eliminating two stitches. This decrease can be found in the lace pattern on Stormwatch. Eventide also has centred double decreases in the dips of the chevron stitch pattern. Save

Raised Increases

Raised Increases

Raised Increase Lifted Increase Invisible Increase My favourite increase is the most invisible and goes by many names. It looks great when stacked to create a taper, like in a sleeve. It also has many abbreviations, none of which are standard and they all mean the same thing: RRI and LRI (right-slanting raised increase and left-slanting raised increase) RSI and LSI (right-slanting increase and left-slanting increase) RLI and LLI (right lifted increase and left lifted increase) LRinc and LLinc (leaning-right increase and leaning-left increase) KRL and KLL (knit right loop and knit left loop) How to: Right-slanting raised increase Work read more