techniques

Cabled Decreases

Cabled Decreases

Video Tutorial Cabled decreases are an elegant way to knit double, triple and even quadruple decreases that lay flat. I like using them in my designs that incorporate English tailored shoulders. I often use double decreases on the back shoulder shaping and I find that cabled decreases are a sophisticated alternative for k3tog and sssk. This video, along with several more, was produced to support the techniques mentioned in my book, Tempest: a collection of 11 patterns designed by Holli Yeoh for SweetGeorgia Yarns. Special thanks to Felicia Lo of SweetGeorgia Yarns for producing read more

Spit Splicing Two Colours

Spit Splicing Two Colours

Spit splicing is one of my favourite ways to join a new ball of yarn when working with wool and wool blends. But what about when you need to join a new colour? I’ve developed this spit splicing technique that can save you so much time weaving in ends. The yarn you use needs to have some wool content for this to work. I’ve had great success spit splicing blends with as little as 30% wool, as well as with superwash wool. 1. Work to the end of the row (or where you need to join a new colour). 2. read more

Raised Increases Video Tutorial

Raised Increases Video Tutorial

Video Tutorial Learn how to do my absolute favourite, go-to increase—the raised increase. I use it in almost everything. It’s the least disruptive to the stitches around it and if only a single raised increase is worked, it’s virtually invisible in a ground of stockinette stitch. This video, along with several more, was produced to support the techniques mentioned in my book, Tempest: a collection of 11 patterns designed by Holli Yeoh for SweetGeorgia Yarns. Special thanks to Felicia Lo of SweetGeorgia Yarns for producing the video. You can view my photo tutorial of read more

Checkered Stitch Pattern

Checkered Stitch Pattern

For me, the iconic Canadian plaid is reminiscent of lumberjacks, bush parties, high school, and weekends at the lake. I’ve recreated it in knit form using intarsia and slipped stitches. There is no stranding in this stitch pattern. You’ll need a circular or double pointed needles for this is a swing style stitch pattern. Two right side rows are worked, followed by two wrong side rows. When you reach the end of the first row, slide the stitches back to the other end of the needle and work the row again. 1. The first row in each pair of rows read more

SSK & SSP Decreases

SSK & SSP Decreases

Video Tutorial The ssk decrease leans to the left and mirrors the right-leaning k2tog decrease. In some patterns we need to do the decrease on the purl side of the work—ssp. It can seem a little tricky at first so here’s a video to help you through it. ssk—slip, slip, knit Slip the next 2 stitches knitwise one at a time and, without twisting them, return them to the left needle then k2tog through the back of the stitches—1 stitch decreased. ssp—slip, slip, purl Slip the next 2 stitches knitwise one at a time and, without twisting them, return them read more

Double Needle Cast On

Double Needle Cast On

This is my favourite way to cast on these days. The long tail cast on is my ‘go to’ cast on but my cast on tension is generally tighter than my knitting tension. Originally developed by June Hemmons Hiatt, I use a variation of the Double Needle Cast On to consistently incorporate the right amount of spacing between my sts so my cast on edge is the same gauge (same width) as my knitting. This is a video I posted on Instagram (click the image to play). I’ve referred students to this video so many times that read more

Centred Double Decrease

Centred Double Decrease

Video Tutorial I like using a centred double decrease when I want I nice vertical line. It’s a decrease that uses three stitches to create one stitch, thus eliminating two stitches. This decrease can be found in the lace pattern on Stormwatch. Eventide also has centred double decreases in the dips of the chevron stitch pattern. Save

Japanese Short Rows

Japanese Short Rows

Video Tutorial Japanese short rows are my favourite method for working short rows. They use less yarn than the wrap and turn method, resulting in an almost invisible turn. Need a pattern to practice this new technique? Try out the Ebb & Flow blanket from my book, Tempest. It’s the perfect beginner’s project for practicing short rows.   Eventide was also mentioned in the video. The shoulders and back neck are shaped using short rows.

Double Bind-Off Video Tutorial

Double Bind-Off Video Tutorial

The Double Bind-Off is a decorative bind off similar to the three needle bind off but it results in two columns of knit stitches that lay nice and flat. Here’s a short video tutorial demonstrating the technique. And for those of you who prefer a quick photo tutorial as a reminder, just scroll down. The Breakers cowl in my book Tempest uses this technique. I have a new pattern that was exclusively designed for River City Yarns coming out soon and it also features the Double Bind-Off. Double Bind-Off Photo Tutorial To work the bind off you’ll need read more

Weft

Weft

Even though it’s not cozy sweater season right now, it is the perfect time to start thinking about a sweater project so it’s ready to wear when the leaves start blowing off the trees in a few months. Weft appeared in the Fall 2014 issue of Twist Collective. The sweater was just returned to me this past week and now I remember again how much I love it! Weft calls for read more